[Upated] KickScooter etiquette in New Zealand

In addition to the thousands of private owners of electric KickScooters already going about their business and daily commute across cities in New Zealand (including Xero’s Rod Drury), CBDs in Auckland and Christchurch are about to receive 3,000 ‘sharing scooters’ from Lime and Onzo.

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The NZ Herald has run an article Scooter etiquette a must for Auckland that raises a number of very interesting points. While it suggests “…an adjustment by citizens” – including pedestrians, drivers of motor vehicles and scooter users themselves, it points out that we’ve all been through this before and it worked out well. The example? The supermarket trolley.

While the supermarket trolley was potentially problematic, the practicality and efficiency it provides overwhelmingly supports its continued use and our society had little difficulty embracing a social etiquette that supported and engrained its continued acceptance. Today, can anyone seriously ponder buying a week’s worth of shopping at the supermarket check-out then having to make a dozen or more trips back and forth to their car parked some distance away?

It may be that lessons learned from the humble supermarket trolley may help Auckland and Christchurch embrace the new future of e-scooters.

While there was the facility for trolleys to be misused and littered around car parks and streets, the systems adopted by supermarkets evolved into something easy for patrons to use and easy return of the trolleys to parking bays. She envisages something similar developing with e-scooters.

“People will have to get used to them but the etiquette could grow in the same way as most of us now return the shopping trolleys to the bays. There will have to be some recognition by scooter uses about responsible use…It will take an adjustment from pedestrians too – making sure they are aware of what is around them.”

NZ’s road user rules for Wheeled Recreational Devices require riders to be courteous and ride at speeds that are not dangerous to others, and give way to pedestrians and mobility device users. We also believe it is polite to say “Excuse me” or “I’m coming past on your right/left” when approaching someone from behind – just as you might if you were walking or jogging at a pace faster than a person walking more slowly in front of you.” Easy, huh?

While the sharing scooter business model is to have all of the kickscooters picked up at the end of the day, recharged overnight, then dropped off at dawn at locations known to require the most demand, overseas some companies have already introduced an alternative: users are paid a credit to bring the KickScooter home and recharge it. According to the NZ Herald, Onzo is may introduce this option immediately.

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Lime and Onzo have agreements in place with local councils, and are working with them to ensure deployment is smooth and well-managed. This is a different strategy than was used in some US markets earlier this year, where kickscooters were simply dumped into some cities without permission (the so-called Uber business model). In a few places overseas this resulted in temporary bans some months later, until permits were issued. However, in every city they can be found (and we’re talking more than 100 cities worldwide already) the humble KickScooter has proved itself to be overwhelmingly useful. That’s right: useful.

The NZ Herald has run a further article announcing the launch of Lime in Auckland and Christchurch on 15 October, and ONZO by the end of the monht, Make no mistake – the needle has already jumped forward in this groove.

This truly is a personal transportation revolution unfolding before our eyes – and in very short measure!

“…[B]oth scooter riders and pedestrians will need to learn how to live with each other….[T]here is a bigger goal here – finding alternative, sustainable ways to get people out of their cars and using public transport. That’s where e-scooters and e-bikes can play a big role – getting people to hubs like train and bus stations.

“I think, too, the element of better health, more exercise, getting people outdoors for their commute – all that outweighs the possibility of someone involved in an accident with an e-scooter, especially if that e-scooter etiquette is heeded.”

Segway New Zealand’s view is that regular users are better off buying their own device, such as our best-selling Ninebot by Segway ES2 model ($1,195 including delivery direct from Segway New Zealand, from our Dealers, and from dozens of Retailers nationwide including Bike Barn and Bikes & Barbers).

As Rod Drury (Xero) says about his Segway KickScooter: “I love my ES2…[it] has transformed Wellington for me. I set meetings on the other side of town now”

We also think that about half of the people buying KickScooters today would be better served by buying one of our self-balancing mini-Series devices: Segway miniPRO ($1,495) or Segway miniPLUS ($1,895). Here’s why.

Self-balancing personal transports bring a number of benefits over KickScooters, but many people have actually get on and try one to discover this for themselves. These include the ability to move very slowly in crowded situations whilst taking up no more space that a standing person. A rider can also wait at rest without dismounting (such as at pedestrian crossings). A more comfortable ride comes hand-in-hand with larger pneumatic tyres, along with the ability to cross rougher terrain and climb steeper hills with ease. Weight and size of the mini-Series devices is similar to a KickScooter when lifting in or out of a car or carrying up stairs, yet the footprint may be smaller when you’re taking your device with you on public transport. Why not try out all of our Segway options today so you can find out what suits you best?

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Buy Segway KickScooters and mini-Series direct from Segway New Zealand and our Dealers, and from Retailers nationwide (including Bike Barn and Bikes & Barbers).

KickScooters, drifting Go-karts, Drift e-skates, Loomo robots, self-balancing Segway personal transporters – Oh My!

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Here is Segway New Zealand’s full line of products as of late-2018 and through to early 2019.

You can BUY all of the products shown aboveRIGHT NOW here in New Zealand by calling us on 0800 2 SEGWAY or emailing us segwaynz@icloud.com

All products are available through our Segway Dealers (BodyElectric in Wellington and Urban Wheels in Christchurch).

Consumer products are available in store at dozens of Retailers in just about every city and town throughout New Zealand. Contact us and we’ll let you know the closest shops to where you live. Consumer products include KickScooter (ES2), Drift (W1), mini-Series (miniLITE/PRO/PLUS), and electric unicycles (S2, Z10).

* Go-kart and Z10 available from 1 November 2018 (pre-order now), Loomo available from late-2018 (pre-order now), S2 available on special order

Sharing Scooters in 100+ cities give 25+ million rides in first 12 months

Sharing Scooter start-ups Lime, Bird and others are barely a year old, yet have spread to hundreds of cities, provided millions of rides, and are valued at billions of dollars.

Lime is bringing its electric kick-scooters to Christchurch and Auckland (and maybe Wellington) any day now, while extant bike sharing company Onzo is set to add electric kick-scooters and e-bikes to its fleet too. Onzo has around 1,500 pedal bikes in Auckland, and had provided 100,000 rides by July 2018.

To get a feeling for the exponential rate of growth these ventures are undergoing, according to The Verge, Lime turned 1 year old in July 2018 and hit 6 million rides that month. By October rides were at 12 million. Lime’s main competitor Bird claimed 10 million rides as it turned 1 year old in September 2018, on scooters deployed across 100 cities.

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Sharing scooters are now competing with ride sharing companies Uber and Lyft in major cities worldwide, so it is no surprise those companies are investing in or launching their own scooters in some places. In July, Uber and Alphabet invested US$335 million in Lime.   Bird recently became the fastest startup to achieve a $2 billion valuation. And to further compete more directly against Uber and Lyft, Bird has just announced it will start delivering scooters to peoples houses.

Traditional pedal bike sharing schemes are also under threat, according to a separate article in The Verge:

Lime says dockless electric vehicles get people to where they’re going a lot faster than pedaling with a traditional bike, too. Electric scooters will get you there 22 percent faster, while electric-assisted bikes will get you there 21 percent faster, according to the company’s research.

When coupled with public transportation, bike-sharing costs about 80 percent less than owning a car, according to Lime, which has made it a popular transit option among people in low-income brackets. In Washington, DC, for example, Lime says it has seen a 20 percent increase of rides on dockless vehicles from people who earn less than $35,000 a year, while usage of docked bikes has remained flat.

In a short period of time commuters, pedestrians and councils have had to both embrace and contend with a significant disruption to the status quo. Ride sharing companies took more than five years to spread and impact cities worldwide, while scooter sharing is having a similar impact in just a year.

To improve safety for riders and pedestrians, geo-speedlimiting is being rolled out in certain areas of some towns in USA. In deals with local governments these companies are sharing anonymised data about routes travelled and volumes of rides taken.

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Lime’s scooter heat map for Santa Monica (source: article in The Verge)

In short order, sharing in its many forms has become the new normal. Segway New Zealand predicts that self-balancing personal transporters will begin to replace a portion of kick scooters within a year, and account for about a third of personal devices being shared within three years. This is because they’re more enjoyable, comfortable and better suited overall for many people in some environments and routes (they just don’t know it yet).

The benefits of sharing scooters, or owning your own e-scooter appear compelling.

Ownership is almost always better for those who commute the same route most days. The Ninebot by Segway ES2 model of KickScooter has not only been the prime choice of of e-scooter used by Lime and Bird, but it is also New Zealand’s best-selling model to consumers who want to buy their own.

Buy the Ninebot by Segway ES2 for just $1,195 direct from Segway New Zealand 0800 2 SEGWAY or email segwaynz@icloud.com, or from retailers nationwide including Bike Barn.

Before you buy a Ninebot by Segway ES2 online be sure to ask the seller if they obtain the item they are selling to you from Segway New Zealand, or if instead they are a grey-market importer who is imported unauthorised (and possibly fake) items. This is an important question because Segway New Zealand does not warrant or support devices that it has not imported, sorry. Why does this matter to you? The Controller Board/Main Board inside every ES2 is security coded to the serial number of the KickScooter, and we cannot program new Boards to serial numbers that we have not imported. Without a functioning Board all you’ll be left with is a plain old mechanical KickScooter to kick around town on.

 

Good to go: Drift W1’s are here, selling out fast!

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There are just a few pairs of Drift W1’s left from our special, air freighted first shipment – so be quick!

Our very first customer picked up and took home their pair of W1’s last night. He was not just the first private owner in the entire Southern Hemisphere, but one of the first in the world (if we don’t count online influencers like iJustine, a few magazine reviewers, etc).

Call 0800 2 SEGWAY or email segwaynz@icloud.com to buy at our early-bird price of $695 (includes GST and delivery nationwide). Or get our great value Drift W1 + Segway Helmet* bundle for just $795.

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If you miss out, our next shipment arrives soon. The Drift W1 goes on sale at retailers across New Zealand later this month, but why not zoom ahead of the crowd, be in first, and get yours today?

Perfect for adventures and fun on long summer days, we think Drift W1’s are going to be very popular gifts this Christmas.

*  Segway helmet is available in Kids (XS) size in orange, or Adult (L/XL) size in blank. There is no intermediate (M) size available.

 

New-age e-Skates are here in NZ! Drift W1’s arrived by air today…have yours by next week!

Segway’s new self-balancing skates are here in New Zealand!

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NZ’s first Segway Drift W1’s (may have come with a free cat inside the box)

The first Drift W1’s in the Southern Hemisphere rolled into Auckland today – and YES they are just as much fun as you’ve imagined.

If you want to be one of the first to own your own contact us 0800 2 SEGWAY or segwaynz@icloud.com

Segway Drift W1 is your new stylish way to move and have fun. Two separate e-Skates offer countless possibilities on ways to use it. The product is made out of high-quality materials that provide you a reliable ride. Step on, improve your skills and challenge your friends – The Segway Drift W1 is fun to master!

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Drift W1’s – a whole new way to ride off into the sunset

 

Megan overcomes MS (multiple sclerosis) limitations with Segway PT bringing ‘Hope on wheels’

Megan Sadler has received her brand new Segway Personal Transporter (PT) after running a successful fund-raising campaign.

Woman’s Day recently ran a two-page feature on Megan (44), who was diagnosed with MS almost 20 years ago. To promote multiple sclerosis awareness week she told her story to the magazine of how she was fund-raising to purchase a Segway PT. Megan explained how she’d first seen another woman with MS using a Segway PT about six years ago – a farmer who used it to get around her south Auckland property to round up her cows, and to glide silently alongside her daughter as give her lessons as she rode her horse.

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“Her…two-wheeler will not only transport her indoors and out, but also help her keep up with her energetic daughters.”

Megan and her husband Paul have three daughters, include two twins. She recognised the Segway PT was by far the best solution to achieve all of the things she was missing out on.

“I have been walking with a stick for the past six years, and I am at the stage now where my muscles are getting weaker and walking any distance is difficult. But I want to stay upright for as long as I can….I will be able to get to the netball courts more easily to watch my girls play, and make it to their Ripper Rugby tournaments.”

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Megan successfully used a Givealittle campaign to raise funds to purchase her Segway PT. She met her target in August, and two weeks ago visited Segway New Zealand to collect her new Segway i2 SE model.

For added convenience and practicality her Segway i2 SE was fitted with a handy Front Bag, and our Segway Accessories kit (InfoKey Protector kit, InfoKey Wrist Strap, Segway Lanyard, Height Adjust Wrench).

Also included in the package were a pair of lightweight, folding Segway Ramps to enable easy loading into the rear of her SUV to carry it internally, and a tow-bar mounted carrier to carry it externally.

In addition to standard i2 SE wheels, Megan also purchased the very useful BodyElectric MAX Wheels. These NZ designed and built wheels provide twice the surface area and grip of standards i2 SE wheels, but are not as wide as a Segway x2’s SE ATV or Turf wheels. MAX Wheels are narrow enough to fit through a standard doorway, but wide enough to enable the Segway PT to easily transverse soft sand at the beach (for a photo see our article The Motorhome RV and the Segway PT), and through soft, slippery muddy sports fields where the standard tyres may not offer sufficient grip.

Hundreds of Kiwis ride Segway PTs every day to enjoy improved mobility and increased enjoyment of life. Standing up and getting out and about on a Segway PT also increases human longevity, according to Professor Sarah Hunger (CBE, University of Oxford).

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Human Longevity lecture (featuring Segway PT) in last week’s NZ Listener magazine

A Segway Personal Transporter (PT) featured prominently in an announcement about an upcoming lecture Human Longevity: myths and possibilities (Professor Sarah Hunger CBE, University of Oxford), to be held at Auckland Museum (6pm Thursday 11 October 2018). Admission is free, and registration is here.

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The Segway PT empowers a person with impaired mobility to get out and about, be active and engaged with the world, stay standing, and keep up with others. The health benefits of standing versus sitting (in a mobility scooter or Powerchair) are well-proven, and all of the above factors contribute to happiness and longevity. Hundreds of New Zealanders with disabilities and reduced walking abilities use Segway PTs every day.

The photograph features Kiwi customers Bryan and Marg Carter, who we’ve featured in our popular article The Motorhome RV and the Segway PT. The Segway PT enables Marg to keep up with her husband Bryan, who is a keen walker. Their Segway i2 SE model is fitted with optional BodyElectric MAX Wheels for easy use on the beach.

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First Segway Ninebot ONE Z10’s arrive in New Zealand

Today the first shipment of the Segway Ninebot ONE Z10 electric unicycles arrived at Segway New Zealand. These are the very first ONE Z10’s to reach the Southern Hemisphere. We’ve got some very excited customers waiting for the courier to deliver tomorrow!

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Going….going….gone – New Zealand’s first shipment of Segway Ninebot ONE Z10’s

Eagerly anticipated for the last few months, the new ONE Z10 feature a large, wide tyre that gives the rider a very unique ride and feel, plus heaps of grip combined with massive presence!

No other “wheel” looks like the ONE Z10. And no other wheel feels or performs quite like it either. Featuring the “redundant” safety that comes from having two separate battery packs, along with features such as IP X7 watertightness and connection to the Segway App, the ONE Z10 stands out from the crowd with legendary Segway-Ninebot “fit and finish.”

Alas, the first shipment has already sold out (yep, before it even arrived).

Yes, we’re taking orders for the next (due in about 5 weeks).

So if you want your own ONE Z10 in time for Christmas and long summer days, we suggest calling us right away on 0800 2 SEGWAY (or emailing segwaynz@icloud.com). We’ll make sure you don’t miss out on the next shipment.

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Lime brings (Segway) dock-less ‘Sharing Scooters’ to Christchurch, Auckland, Wellington

Lime is bringing its popular dock-less ‘sharing kickscooters’ to Christchurch and (probably) to Auckland and Wellington. According to Stuff’s article 700 Shared electric scooters to be let loose on Christchurch streets the city council has approved a trial that is expected to begin later this month. If successful, the number of scooters deployed in that city is expected to double.

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The new Lime-S Segway Edition, powered by Segway.

Lime is best-known for deploying thousands of Ninebot by Segway KickScooters across dozens of cities in the United States. An application is currently before Auckland Council to deploy 1,000 scooters in New Zealand’s largest city.

Scooter sharing businesses rely on a having a critical mass of devices deployed and scattered around a town, so there is likely to be an scooter nearby and ready for use whenever someone wants one. This is a classic example of the multiplying power of what is known as ‘the network effect.’ Scooters can be found by simply looking about, or via a map displayed by the Lime App that shows the location of all nearby scooters.

According to the Stuff article the scooters will cost $1 to unlock and $0.30 per minute to use:

The scooters, which operate in more than 80 places around the world, will cost $1 to unlock and 30 cents per minute to use, or $18 an hour. Users find, unlock and pay for them using an app. The dockless system means people can leave them at their destination.

Users are required to be 18 years of age or more.

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel is particularly enthusiastic about Lime coming to the city, citing the flexibility that kickscooters (defined as ‘wheeled recreational devices’ fitted with auxiliary motors with up to 300 Watt power output) offer city-dwellers:

Mayor Lianne Dalziel said not having to wear a helmet was what she loved about the scooters.

“All of the evidence shows that wearing a helmet puts you at far greater risk than not wearing a helmet and that is because people assume that if you are wearing a helmet you are safer than you are. I don’t feel the same way about children. I think children should wear helmets.

“Let grown-ups be grown-ups. Let people take some risks but also have some fun.”

She said the top speed of 27kmh was not the speed the scooters would normally be ridden at.

“I just think it will take off and do really really well.”

Christchurch considers itself a city that is open to trying new ideas, and doubtless deployments of Lime scooters in Auckland and Wellington will follow (Lime is advertising for an Operations Manager in Wellington here).

In the view of Stuff’s Blayne Slabbert, Electric scooters could be Kiwi answer to congestion.

In USA Lime deploys the Ninebot by Segway ES1/ES2 Kickscooters, to which Lime attaches their own custom, lime-coloured box that contains immobiliser/mobiliser, GPS and QR/barcode reading components that work in conjunction with the Lime App. Earlier this year Lime launched their Lime-S Segway Edition version kickscooter, powered of course by Segway. It is expected Lime will deploy Segway KickScooters in New Zealand, too.

According to our information, a locally owned scooter sharing start-up business is also likely to launch in at least one of these three cities, providing competition to Lime.

Similarly, opportunities likely exist for Kiwi businesses wanting to offer dock-less shared scooters and/or docked hire scooters (i.e. return to point-of-hire) in smaller towns, at hotels and resorts, on worksites, and on campuses. The self-balancing Segway PT and Segway miniPLUS are also suitable for these roles.

Segway New Zealand invites start-ups and other interested parties to contact us on 0800 2 SEGWAY because we offer a complete Segway-built, out-of-the box solution that includes our latest commercial grade KickScooter, client App, and complete back-end support that automates customer billing, location data, safety/incident reporting, etc.

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