Posts Tagged SE-3 patroller

Segway’s new SE-3 Patroller is coming to New Zealand this year

Last year Segway, Inc. launched the SE-3 Patroller, a three-wheeled stand-up vehicle designed for Public Safety roles: security, police, emergency response. Demand for the SE-3 in USA and Canada has been so high from police departments, aviation security services and private security companies that patrol sites such as shopping malls and stadiums that almost so almost no SE-3 Patrollers have been seen anywhere outside North America.

Philip Bendall on the Segway SE-3 Patroller (Queensland, Australia)

Philip Bendall on the Segway SE-3 Patroller (Queensland, Australia)

Last week Segway New Zealand’s Philip Bendall test-rode the only SE-3 Patroller in the Southern Hemisphere, at Segway Queensland (Australia). This machine is destined for deployment by Queensland Police, who already have officers patrolling public spaces on two-wheeled, self-balancing Segway x2 SE Patrollers.
(left) SE-3 Patroller; (right) Segway x2 SE Patroller front shields lined up for use by Queensland Police officers

(left) SE-3 Patroller; (right) Segway x2 SE Patroller front shields lined up for use by Queensland Police officers

Segway New Zealand intends landing the first Segway SE-3 Patroller into New Zealand during Q2 2015. We’re encouraging organisations interested in trying it out in their environment to be in touch. We’ll be loaning it for up to a week at a time so your workplace can really get a feel for the utility and capabilities of the SE-3 Patroller. This vehicle is a new concept – it is not a PT, it is not a golf cart, but something that brings elements of both as well as unique capabilities. We expect the SE-3 Patroller to be of interest to airport security contractors and the Aviation Security Service, to universities and similar large campus sites, to large factories and worksites, to sports stadiums, to private security companies and to Councils. Here is a FAQ with details specifications and a discussion of the unique propositions that the SE-3 Patroller has to offer.
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Showtime for the SE-3 Patroller: watch new video here

It’s the newest tool for community policing from the company that brought you the Segway PT – and it’s got it all. The SE-3 can pass through doors, maneuver in reverse, is weather resistant, features hot swappable batteries and can be charged at any electrical outlet. The public safety community will appreciate how it improves mobility, maneuverability, visibility, interaction and responsiveness.

Watch this new 3 minute video here then contact Segway New Zealand on 0800 2 SEGWAY to arrange an on-site demonstration for July and August 2014. We’re taking the a SE-3 Patroller on tour around New Zealand to Universities, Shopping Malls, security companies and Councils, together with the new i2 SE and x2 SE Patrollers.

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More spec’s on the Segway SE-3 Patroller

The new Segway SE-3 Patroller is a natural extension of Segway’s Patroller product line. Because it is somewhat different to our well-known, self-balancing, two-wheeled i2 SE and x2 SE Patrollers, here are some common Question & Answers about the new SE-3:

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Q: What are some reasons New Zealand security, Police, emergency response and public safety services may choose the three-wheel SE-3 Patroller over the traditional Personal Transporter (PT)?

A: Compared to the i2 SE and x2 SE Patrollers, the SE-3 Patroller is meant for those missions specifically requiring a larger vehicle, a more obvious security presence without a rider aboard, or where an officer must frequently mount and dismount the vehicle.

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Q: What is the maximum speed, and can it be limited like the Segway PT?

A: The default maximum speed is 24 km/h. It can also be limited to 12, 16, or 20 kn/h. Extensive interviews with public safety officers confirmed there is no reason to travel faster than 24 km/h on the SE-3 Patroller — and most would want to set it lower.

Q: Is the speed intelligently throttled going up/down slopes like the Segway PT, and is there regenerative braking?

A: No, speed is not governed on inclines. Unlike on the Segway PT the brushless DC motors do not contribute to braking, so there is no regenerative braking.

Q: Is there a turning radius change at higher speeds or is it mechanical turning?

A: The SE-3 Patroller features mechanical turning, however, there is anti-rollover technology that reduces motor torque when the vehicle is turning quickly.

Q: Is there any suspension?

A: There is no traditional suspension, but the SE-3 Patroller has a large, low-pressure front tire and a cushioned comfort mat on the riding platform.

Q: If a rider gets off the unit, does it automatically turn off?

A: No, but the throttle is disabled if no rider is present.

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Q: What is the battery range of the SE-3 Patroller, and what impact will accessories have on the batteries?

Range is dependent on many factors including terrain, riding style, payload and tyre pressure. With both hot-swappable batteries and “charge anywhere” technology that allows you to top-off at any standard outlet, range can be extended indefinitely. While many accessories may be powered through the 12V power outlet by the SE-3’s batteries, the effect on range depends upon the accessory and how it is used.

Q: What’s the process to swap out the battery module and how long does it take?

To change the battery module, simply flip 2 latches and slide it out. Slide in a fully charged battery module and secure the latches. The whole process takes less than a minute. The SE-3 Patroller uses one battery module which consists of two 24V Lithium battery packs (unlike the Segway PT, which uses two separate 72V Lithium battery packs).

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Q: What type of key does the SE-3 use?

A: Unlike the Segway PT and its InfoKey, the SE-3 Patroller uses a standard metal key.

Q: Is there a yelp or siren sound?

A: Yes, there is a chirp and siren.

Q: Does the SE-3 have a driving light?

A: Yes, there is a high intensity forward-facing LED light.

Q: Any plans for a consumer version?

A: At this time, there are no plans for a consumer version of the SE-3 Patroller.

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Three-wheeled SE-3 Patroller launched by Segway, Inc. in US today

Segway, Inc. launched the new SE-3 Patroller three-wheeled ‘Standup Electric Vehicle’ in the US market today.

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Designed for police, security patrol and public safety sectors, this new vehicle is described as “…a natural extension of Segway’s Patroller product line — an ideal match for missions that require a larger vehicle, which displays a more visible and obvious security presence (even in a parked position without a rider aboard), or that require a rider to frequently mount and dismount the vehicle during a patrol.”

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“Powered by multiple rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries that can be charged at any standard electrical outlet or swapped out for replacement batteries to allow for continuous use, the SE-3 Patroller also features independent direct rear wheel drive, travels in reverse and turns in a very tight radius.”

Like the popular i2 SE Patroller and x2 SE Patroller models of self-balancing, two-wheeled Segway Personal Transporters (PTs) already in use at more than 1,500 sites around the world, the new SE-3 Patroller has been very thoughtfully designed to meet the specific needs of officers. Emergency lights, a headlight, brake lighting, siren and lockable storage are built-in. The 11cm color display is sunlight-readable and provides the rider easy-to-understand operational data including speed, battery life and distance travelled. Video recording and live-broadcasting equipment can be added, as can a range of other devices via the accessory bar and powered electrical output ports.

Click here to find out more information about the SE-3 Patroller (this link takes you to Segway, Inc.’s website page about the SE-3 Patroller and the i2 SE and x2 SE Patrollers). The SE-3 Patroller may become available in New Zealand in the future.

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